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Pollock’s explosions stain Barcelona’s Joan Miró Foundation

The Fundació Joan Miró, located in the Catalan capital, unveils a temporary exhibition called “Explosion! The legacy of Jackson Pollock”, which shows the influence Pollock’s works had on later artists. The temporary exhibition is made up of 70 works from 35 different artists, such as Andy Warhol, Lynda Benglis, Shozo Simamoto, Yoko Ono and Jackson Pollock himself. The exhibition is co-produced by Barcelona’s Miró Foundation and the Moderna Museet from Stockholm. It will run until 24th February 2013.

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23 October 2012 01:31 AM

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ACN / Pere Francesch

Barcelona (ACN).- The legacy of Jackson Pollock is explained in the new temporary exhibition organised by Barcelona\u2019s Joan Miró Foundation. The exhibition shows the influence Pollock\u2019s works had on later artists. It is called \u201CExplosion! The legacy of Jackson Pollock\u201D and it is made up of 70 works from 35 different artists, such as Andy Warhol, Lynda Benglis, Shozo Simamoto, Yoko Ono and Jackson Pollock himself. The exhibition wants to reflect on the influence and connections the so-called \u2018action painting\u2019 \u2013 of which Pollock is the main representative \u2013 had on later artists. It is made up of paintings, photographs, videos, performances, dance and audio bites. \u201CJackson Pollock\u2019s legacy is very powerful and we focus on the inflection point\u201D that happened after the Second World War until the 1970s, explained the exhibition\u2019s curator Magnus af Petersens on Monday. The show is co-produced by Barcelona\u2019s Fundació Joan Miró and the Moderna Museet from Stockholm. It will run from Wednesday until 24th February  2013.


The exhibition begins with the artists who emerged after WWII from the painting by Jackson Pollock and the Japanese artistic group Gutai, who was working in a radical way in the border between painting and performance. \u201CWe are showing this legacy, this heritage and the way of understanding art that arose in many parts of the world at the same time; and this is a new thing\u201D offered by this exhibition, emphasised Magnus af Petersens.

The curator explained that they have focused on the years in which \u201Cthe explosion happened\u201D and the concept of art was enlarged. The selection of artists reflects this goal. \u201CThere are works from younger artists, but we focused on the change\u2019s moment\u201D, he underlined. \u201CJackson Pollock\u2019s legacy is very powerful and we focus on the inflection point\u201D, he said. According to Petersens, in many of the works that are shown in the exhibition or from contemporary art there are references to Pollock, and not only to him but also to the captions of Pollock working and dancing. \u201CThis change of the work of art\u2019s importance as an object makes it turn into the celebration of an event\u201D, he said.

A change that was pushed forward by artist who decided to start from scratch and express feelings using violent attacks against the traditional conventions on painting and the fabric of the canvas. This can be seen in Pollock\u2019s works at the exhibition.

There are also works from Kazuo Shiraga, who painted with his feet being attached to a rope; from Shozo Shimamoto, who threw glass bottles filled with paint against his work; or from Niki de Saint Phalle, who shot a rifle against panels and soffit boards prepared by her with balloons filled with paint and surrounded by layers of plaster. The exhibition also shows works from Andy Warhol, Allan Kaprow and even from Yoko Ono.

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  • Three Jackson Pollock's canvas shown at the Fundació Joan Miró (by P. Francesch)

  • The temporary exhibition 'Explode! The legacy of Jackson Pollock' reflects on the 'action painting' (by P. Francesch)

  • Three Jackson Pollock's canvas shown at the Fundació Joan Miró (by P. Francesch)
  • The temporary exhibition 'Explode! The legacy of Jackson Pollock' reflects on the 'action painting' (by P. Francesch)