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Motion for dialogue agreed by Spain's Socialists and pro-independence PDeCAT

Text urges both governments to sit down at negotiating table "without impositions" and within Spanish legal framework

 

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12 September 2018 01:26 PM

by

ACN | Madrid

The Spanish ruling Socialist party and one of the pro-independence parties ruling Catalonia, PDeCAT, have agreed on a motion in favor of dialogue between Barcelona and Madrid.

The parliamentary text, which will be debated in Spain's Congress on Wednesday and voted on Thursday, urges the Spanish executive to "open a political dialogue process with the Catalan government where everyone can defend their ideas, aspirations, and projects freely, without impositions or hindrances."

"This process of dialogue has to agree on the legal and democratic paths which will allow the democratic society decide its future," reads the motion.   

The initiative was PDeCAT's, the base party for the Catalan president's candidacy, Junts per Catalunya.

They accepted an amendment by the Socialists reading "within the [Spanish] legal framework in force," which made the agreement possible.

 

  • "This process of dialogue has to agree on the legal and democratic paths which will allow the democratic society decide its future within the legal framework in force"

    Parliamentary motion agreed by Socialists and PDeCAT

PDeCAT believes that the current legal framework enables Catalonia and Spain to agree on a referendum on self-determination.

ERC and CUP do not back motion

Yet not everyone agrees in the pro-independence field agrees with the motion. Esquerra Republicana (ERC) said it will either abstain or vote 'no,' on the grounds that legality cannot "put a limit" on dialogue. Far-left CUP, meanwhile, believes the motion severely violates the people's will.

Dialogue between Barcelona and Madrid

The new Catalan and Spanish presidents, who both took office in spring, met for the first time in July in Madrid and are due to sit down again together this autumn in Barcelona.

But while Quim Torra defends a referendum on self-determination for Catalonia, his Spanish counterpart Pedro Sánchez has ruled it out several times.

Legality of referendum

The pro-independence movement has claimed in the past few years that a Scottish-like referendum is possible within the Spanish Constitution.

Yet the former People's Party Spanish executive said that the legal framework makes it impossible for such a vote. While in opposition, the Socialists always agreed with the People's Party's stance.

In 2017, the Catalan government organized a referendum on independence without Madrid's agreement and the Spanish Constitutional Court ruled it as unconstitutional.

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  • The Spanish president, Pedro Sánchez, in the Spanish Congress on September 12, 2018 (by Spanish Congress)

  • The Spanish president, Pedro Sánchez, in the Spanish Congress on September 12, 2018 (by Spanish Congress)

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